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The man who taught me how to be a carpenter is fastidiously clean.  On any given work day the two of us would spend no less than one hour cleaning up.   Once a single task was completed, it was the protocol on site to put all of the tools involved away.  On a typical jobsite there is cleaning, but typically that takes place on Friday afternoon for the last twenty minutes of the work-week.  A tradesman might leave his tools wherever he happens to drop them until he has need of them again.  My Uncle Norman was self taught.  Now that I am older, out from under the umbrella of my mentor’s oversite, I find cleaning on the job site to be cathartic.  When there is trash scattered around, no matter who it is that did the spreading, I find I can focus on little else.  

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Today I walked to the local market and purchased a roll of trash bags.  In the States our jobsite would be outfitted with trash cans and maybe even a dumpster.  The last location I worked in Seattle was on the campus of the University of Washington.  If precaution, safety, cleanliness and the proper disposal of waste are taken to the extreme in Seattle, Washington, the opposite can be said about Fushekruje, Albania.  As it strives for acceptance into the European Union, perhaps Albania will take a greater interest in the environment and the human animal’s constant damaging of it.

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Visi worked on the wall, as has been his running task off and on for the past two months.  Our friend Kole came by to check up on us in around mid-morning.  We plan to have him back for a day of work tomorrow.  Kole is strong and works with a rare intensity.  I am looking forward to seeing what he can accomplish in a day.  Yesterday, while I was in Vorë, 14 of the windows were installed at the church.  Hopefully you will come to a service there some day, to get the lay of the land for yourself.

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